Posts Tagged ‘sports’
Kid of the 80s

nolan-ryan-5k

On August 22, 1989, Nolan Ryan became the first (and only) pitcher in major league history to register 5,000 career strikeouts.

Ryan would go on to rack up a total of 5,714 strikeouts.

During Ryan’s major league record 27-year baseball career (1966, 1968–1993), he pitched for four different teams: the New York Mets, California Angels, Houston Astros and Texas Rangers. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999.

Kid of the 80s

mike-tyson-wins

Mike Tyson became the youngest heavyweight boxing champion. In 1987, he became the first boxer to simultaneously hold WBC, WBA and IBF titles.

In 1988, Tyson became the lineal champion when he knocked out Michael Spinks after 91 seconds. Tyson successfully defended the world heavyweight championship nine times, including victories over Larry Holmes and Frank Bruno. In 1990, he lost his titles to underdog James “Buster” Douglas, by a knockout in round 10.

Kid of the 80s

pete-rose-at-bat

In September 1985, Pete Rose broke Ty Cobb’s all-time hits record with his 4,192nd hit. The 44-year-old was player and manager of the Cincinnati Reds.

Because Rose broke Cobb’s record, ABC’s Wide World of Sports named him as its Athlete of the Year in 1985. Rose accumulated a total of 4,256 hits before his final career at-bat in August of 1986.

Sports Illustrated exposed the public to allegations that Rose had placed bets on baseball games with their cover story in April of 1989. In August, Rose voluntarily accepted a permanent place on baseball’s ineligible list.

In July of 2009, the New York Daily News reported that the Commissioner of Major League Baseball had seriously considered lifting Rose’s lifetime suspension from baseball. The next day, the commissioner shot down these rumors and Rose remains suspended, indefinitely.

Kid of the 80s

aerobic-competition

The first National Aerobic Championship was held in the USA in 1984. Crystal Light sponsored the televised competitions.

Kid of the 80s

jim-abbott

On April 8, 1989, Jim Abbot made his major league debut. The one-armed California Angels pitcher finished the year with a 3.92 ERA.

When preparing to pitch the ball, Abbott would rest a mitt on the end of his right forearm. After releasing the ball, he would quickly slip his hand into the mitt, usually in time to field any balls that a two-handed pitcher would be able to field. At all levels, teams tried to exploit his fielding disadvantage by repeatedly bunting to him; this tactic was never effective.

Abbott retired after the 1999 season with a career record of 87–108 and a 4.25 ERA.